SECOND OPINION | Pregnancy paradox: Dangers of not testing drugs on pregnant women

SECOND OPINION | Pregnancy paradox: Dangers of not testing drugs on pregnant women thumbnail

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Pregnant women can get sick. And women with illnesses do get pregnant. Yet most drugs have never been tested for their effects during pregnancy.

That’s because pregnant women are usually excluded from drug trials because the risks are considered too great.

The researchers have recruited people, from both rural and urban areas, who can’t afford their drugs. Half are receiving medicine free. The other half — the control group — are not. In other words, they still can’t afford the drugs they’re prescribed.

“We’ll be able to see what happens to those people over time,” Persaud told CBC Health. “Do they manage to obtain access to medications through the existing private and public programs?”

There are 140 medicines being provided for free, including drugs for high blood pressure, diabetes, HIV, hypothyroidism, rheumatoid arthritis, pneumonia, ear infections and gout.



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