Now, paper-based battery powered by your saliva

Now, paper-based battery powered by your saliva thumbnail

NEW YORK: Scientists have developed a new high-performance, paper-based battery powered by saliva that can be used in extreme conditions where normal batteries do not function. Researchers from Binghamton University in the US created the battery by building microbial fuel cells with inactive, freeze-dried cells which generate power within minutes of adding saliva. The battery generated reliable power from one drop of saliva, supplying on-board power that could be used by the next generation of disposable, paper-based Point of Care (POC) diagnostic platforms, researchers said. The battery has competitive advantages…

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New technique reveals inner structure of live embryos in 3D

New technique reveals inner structure of live embryos in 3D thumbnail

WASHINGTON: Scientists have developed a way to produce three-dimensional (3D) images of live embryos, an advance that may help select most viable embryos for successful pregnancies during in vitro fertilisation (IVF). The cost of a single IVF cycle can be $20,000, making it desirable to succeed in as few attempts as possible, said researchers from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in the US. Advanced knowledge regarding the health of embryos could help physicians select those that are most likely to lead to successful pregnancies, they said. Called gradient light interference…

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New Pac-Man like microbot can capture, transport single cells

New Pac-Man like microbot can capture, transport single cells thumbnail

WASHINGTON: Scientists have developed a Pac-Man like magnetic microbot that can capture and transport individual living cells, an advance that may help probe the response of cancer cells to drugs. Researchers at North Carolina State University and Duke University in the US have developed a way to assemble and pre-programme tiny structures made from microscopic cubes to change their shape under a magnetic field. Using the magnetic energy the “microbot origami” can perform a variety of tasks – including capturing and transporting single cells. The findings, published in the journal…

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Mishap doesn’t dampen enthusiasm for security robots

Mishap doesn't dampen enthusiasm for security robots thumbnail

On his first day at work as a security guard, Steve was greeted warmly, drawing attention from passersby, including some taking selfies with him at the tony retail-residential complex he patrolled. Then he fell into the fountain. Steve was a security robot employed by the Washington Harbour center in the Georgetown district of the US capital. According to some tech watchers, robots like Steve herald a new era for intelligent machines assisting in crime prevention and law enforcement. Steve’s mishap in mid-July set of a flurry of reaction on social…

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New self-destructing materials may lead to vanishing ink

New self-destructing materials may lead to vanishing ink thumbnail

BERLIN: Scientists have created a new material that disintegrates itself at an appointed time, an advance that may pave the way for products like vanishing ink and molecules for drug delivery. The secret behind self-destructing molecules is that they would require a tiny input of energy to stay in their useful form, without it they disintegrate, researchers said. “A cell constantly needs nutrients and energy. Otherwise, it would just fall apart to its simple building blocks,” said Job Boekhoven, from the Technical University of Munich in Germany. The molecular structures…

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Sun’s core rotates four times faster than its surface: Study

Sun's core rotates four times faster than its surface: Study thumbnail

LOS ANGELES: The Sun’s core rotates nearly four times faster than its surface, according to a “surprise” finding that may reveal what the solar body was like when it formed. Scientists had assumed the core was rotating like a merry-go-round at about the same speed as the surface. “The most likely explanation is that this core rotation is left over from the period when the Sun formed, some 4.6 billion years ago,” said Roger Ulrich, a professor at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) in the US. “It is a…

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New tech can reverse ageing in human cells

New tech can reverse ageing in human cells thumbnail

HOUSTON: Scientists have developed a new technology that can reverse ageing and rejuvenate human cells, an advance that may help treat progeria – a disorder that causes children to age too quickly. While advances have been made to slow down ageing in humans, true age-reversal at a cellular level remains difficult to achieve. Researchers at Houston Methodist Research Institute in the US studied cells from children with progeria, a rare condition marked by rapid ageing that usually robs them of the chance to live beyond their early teens. “We wanted…

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Scientists to chase solar eclipse using NASA jets

Scientists to chase solar eclipse using NASA jets thumbnail

WASHINGTON: In a first, scientists are planning to chase the shadow of the Moon using NASA’s research jets during the upcoming total solar eclipse in the US, in order to capture the clearest ever images of the Sun’s outer atmosphere. Amir Caspi of the Southwest Research Institute in the US and his team will use two of NASA’s WB-57F research jets to follow the darkness across the US on August 21. Taking observations from twin telescopes mounted on the noses of the planes, Caspi will capture the clearest images of…

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