Sugar makes cancer tumours more aggressive: Study

Sugar makes cancer tumours more aggressive: Study thumbnail

LONDON: Scientists have found that sugar ‘awakens’ cancer cells and makes tumours more aggressive, according to a nine-year long research that is being hailed as a crucial breakthrough in cancer research. The research project conducted by Vlaams Instituut voor Biotechnologie (VIB), Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (KU Leuven) and Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) in Belgium clarified how the Warburg effect, a phenomenon in which cancer cells rapidly break down sugars, stimulates tumour growth. The discovery provides evidence for a positive correlation between sugar and cancer, which may have far- reaching impacts on…

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Neanderthal DNA may have shaped our modern looks

Neanderthal DNA may have shaped our modern looks thumbnail

LONDON: Neanderthal genes have contributed to human skin tone, hair colour, sleep patterns, mood, and even a person’s smoking status, find a study. The study, led by researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Germany, explored the “influence Neanderthal DNA might be having on ordinary variation in people today”, said Janet Kelso, a biologist at the institute. Earlier studies had suggested that human genes involved in skin and hair biology were strongly influenced by Neanderthal DNA, Kelso said. But it had not been clear how. “We can…

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Neanderthal DNA may have shaped our modern looks

Neanderthal DNA may have shaped our modern looks thumbnail

LONDON: Neanderthal genes have contributed to human skin tone, hair colour, sleep patterns, mood, and even a person’s smoking status, find a study. The study, led by researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Germany, explored the “influence Neanderthal DNA might be having on ordinary variation in people today”, said Janet Kelso, a biologist at the institute. Earlier studies had suggested that human genes involved in skin and hair biology were strongly influenced by Neanderthal DNA, Kelso said. But it had not been clear how. “We can…

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Moon once had an atmosphere: NASA study

Moon once had an atmosphere: NASA study thumbnail

The Moon had an atmosphere about three to four billion years ago, when intense volcanic eruptions spewed gases above the surface faster than they could escape to space, a Nasa study has found. When one looks up at the Moon, dark surfaces of volcanic basalt can be easily seen to fill large impact basins.

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Mercury’s poles icier than thought: Study

Mercury's poles icier than thought: Study thumbnail

WASHINGTON: There may be much more ice on Mercury’s scorching hot surface than thought, say scientists who have found evidence of frozen water hidden away on crater floors that are permanently shadowed from the Sun’s blistering rays. A study, published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, found three new craters near Mercury’s north pole that appear to harbour large surface ice deposits. The research also shows evidence of smaller-scale deposits scattered around Mercury’s north pole, both inside craters and in shadowed terrain between craters. Those deposits may be small, but…

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New type of washable solar cell developed

New type of washable solar cell developed thumbnail

TOKYO: Scientists have developed a new type of water-proof solar cell which can provide electricity even after being soaked in water or stretched and compressed. The finding could open the way for wearable solar cells, which will provide power to devices such as health monitors incorporated into clothing, researchers said. These could include sensors that record heartbeats and body temperature, for example, providing early warning of medical problems, they said. Researchers, including those from the University of Tokyo in Japan, developed extremely thin and flexible organic photovoltaic cells, coated on…

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New type of washable solar cell developed

New type of washable solar cell developed thumbnail

TOKYO: Scientists have developed a new type of water-proof solar cell which can provide electricity even after being soaked in water or stretched and compressed. The finding could open the way for wearable solar cells, which will provide power to devices such as health monitors incorporated into clothing, researchers said. These could include sensors that record heartbeats and body temperature, for example, providing early warning of medical problems, they said. Researchers, including those from the University of Tokyo in Japan, developed extremely thin and flexible organic photovoltaic cells, coated on…

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